1920 TO 1950 PERIOD P

A GOOD LOOK AT THE PERIOD VERY LATE 1920's UNTIL THE MID 1950's.  THIS OF COURSE SHOWS THE FULL WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY ENVIRONMENT OF THE ROYAL NAVY FROM DAY ONE OF WW2.

THE LISTS BELOW, DATED 1939,  SHOW THE NAMES OF THE SHIPS WHICH TOOK PART IN THE WAR LITERALLY FROM THE BEGINNING, OR WERE BUILT/BUILDING READY FOR WAR.  HOWEVER, THOSE LOST IN THE OPENING MONTHS OF THE WAR E.G., ROYAL OAK# ARE NOT LISTED. WHEN A SHIP'S ENTRY IS BLANK, IT MEANS THAT IT HAD NOT BEEN FITTED OUT FROM NEW-BUILD E.G., HMS ANSON [KG V CLASS] FIRST COMMISSIONED 1942.  HOWEVER, THE KING GEORGE V HERSELF HAD BEEN COMMISSIONED SO HER FIT CAN BE READ FOR ALL KG V CLASS BATTLESHIPS.

#  We have sourced Royal Oak's fit separately.  Her transmitter outfit was the Types 36M, 43C, 49C, 60E and 73X; her D/F the FH2/LM1; her Wa/T the 405.

The Ionosphere - [See the Post WW1 Years - 1920's file -THE POST WW1 YEARS - THE 1920's P]

The 1931 version of the Admiralty Handbook for W/T had got to the Heavyside Layer, only considering what went on in that layer both day and night without considering what might be going on 250 miles above the earths surface. The original name for the ionosphere [1902] was the "Kennelly-Heavyside Layer" named after the two British scientists who discovered this ionised layer, and they were stimulated by the successful transmissions made across the Atlantic by Marconi in 1901.  They knew that the least height above sea level before ionisation took effect was approximately 60 miles although it wasn't 'set in stone' and was known to vary between day and night, summer and winter. What follows is the Royal Navy's state of understanding in the early 1930's 1930 em waves part 1.pdf and 1930 em waves part 2.pdf.

Later on, when the subject of the Ionosphere was fully understood, the Navy produced documents like this Propagation as taught and used in the Royal Navy.pdf